nobrocomputing
nobrocomputing:

This Air Force photograph is part of a series I found in the National Archives - there are no captions or identifying information for this image. The series shows a number of women engaged with the same Univac computer,  posed and clearly coached from off-camera. You can see another one at http://complexfields.tumblr.com/post/10791375949/found-this-in-the-air-force-still-image-archives. I’m working with images like this as part of a project on the “operator” as a post-war icon.

I cannot believe how fantastic this picture is. This woman is so young but she looks so accomplished and confident. 

nobrocomputing:

This Air Force photograph is part of a series I found in the National Archives - there are no captions or identifying information for this image. The series shows a number of women engaged with the same Univac computer,  posed and clearly coached from off-camera. You can see another one at http://complexfields.tumblr.com/post/10791375949/found-this-in-the-air-force-still-image-archives. I’m working with images like this as part of a project on the “operator” as a post-war icon.

I cannot believe how fantastic this picture is. This woman is so young but she looks so accomplished and confident. 

stoweboyd

Until a year ago, I felt that I wasn’t fully able to perform my job as a kind of project leader for inspiration, because my time was not really my own. Like many people, I was hyper-scheduled, often in depressingly small chunks of time, at one meeting after another, with very little time in between. I remember one particular day when I had a different appointment or task every 10 minutes. My brain almost exploded.

Creative people thrive on serendipity, spontaneous interactions, moments of ribald humor, intense debate or just simple eye contact, and I felt as if I was losing myself. I decided that it was time to act. So I tried an experiment. I just stopped saying yes and started saying no to things.

Actually, there was a bit more method to my madness. I started a ritual that I still use today: I sit down and look at my calendar every Sunday night, pore through my coming week’s meetings and cancel a bunch of them — redundant ones where I don’t need to be “in the loop,” ones where there is an opportunity for someone else to make a decision, ones that don’t particularly inspire me, or ones where I can’t really add value. My overarching goal right now, wherever possible, is to give myself more time to simply be.

Paul Bennett, Where the Fish Swims, Ideas Fly

Two great lines:

I just stopped saying yes and started saying no to things. […] My overarching goal right now, wherever possible, is to give myself more time to simply be.

(via stoweboyd)

I really love this. Saying no is my biggest challenge. 

Beauty is often treated as an essentially feminine subject, something trivial and frivolous that women are excessively concerned with. Men, meanwhile, are typically seen as having a straightforward and uncomplicated relationship with it: they are drawn to it. The implication is that this may be unfortunate—not exactly ideal morally—but it can’t be helped, because it’s natural, biological. This seems more than a little ironic. Women are not only subject to a constant and exhausting and sometimes humiliating scrutiny—they are also belittled for caring about their beauty, mocked for seeking to enhance or to hold onto their good looks, while men are just, well, being men.
stoweboyd

Jared Bernstein, Charting A Path To Shared Prosperity
As the chart reveals, once the recoveries of the 1980s, and even more so in the 1990s, took hold, real household incomes grew at both the middle and the bottom. They grew faster at the top, as the forces of inequality increased in these years. And since all of the last three recoveries began as “jobless” and “wageless” (i.e., though gross domestic product was growing, jobs and real wages lagged), it took a while for the expansions to lift those in the middle and below. But eventually, they did.
In the 2000s, however, the recovery hardly reached the middle or poor households at all. Including this year’s stable 15 percent rate, poverty has gotten worse or stayed the same for 11 of the last 12 years.
This is a remarkable and persistent disconnection between growth and living standards. For well over a decade, households that would have gotten ahead in previous periods of our economic history have failed to do so. Even when the top was outpacing the rest, as in the 1980s and 1990s, middle and low-income households made up some ground. Poverty rates declined at least somewhat in the 1980s expansion, and fell considerably more in the full-employment economy of the latter 1990s.
If there’s one picture I could show to policy makers to wake them up to the profound costs to broad swaths of Americans of gridlock, austerity, immobility and just the general ignoring of the central economic problem — the disconnect between overall growth and shared prosperity — it would be this.


A rising tide, eh?

Jared Bernstein, Charting A Path To Shared Prosperity

As the chart reveals, once the recoveries of the 1980s, and even more so in the 1990s, took hold, real household incomes grew at both the middle and the bottom. They grew faster at the top, as the forces of inequality increased in these years. And since all of the last three recoveries began as “jobless” and “wageless” (i.e., though gross domestic product was growing, jobs and real wages lagged), it took a while for the expansions to lift those in the middle and below. But eventually, they did.

In the 2000s, however, the recovery hardly reached the middle or poor households at all. Including this year’s stable 15 percent rate, poverty has gotten worse or stayed the same for 11 of the last 12 years.

This is a remarkable and persistent disconnection between growth and living standards. For well over a decade, households that would have gotten ahead in previous periods of our economic history have failed to do so. Even when the top was outpacing the rest, as in the 1980s and 1990s, middle and low-income households made up some ground. Poverty rates declined at least somewhat in the 1980s expansion, and fell considerably more in the full-employment economy of the latter 1990s.

If there’s one picture I could show to policy makers to wake them up to the profound costs to broad swaths of Americans of gridlock, austerity, immobility and just the general ignoring of the central economic problem — the disconnect between overall growth and shared prosperity — it would be this.

A rising tide, eh?

abbyjean

With New York City’s homeless population in shelters at a record high of 50,000, a growing number of New Yorkers punch out of work and then sign in to a shelter, city officials and advocates for the homeless say. More than one out of four families in shelters, 28 percent, include at least one employed adult, city figures show, and 16 percent of single adults in shelters hold jobs. Mostly female, they are engaged in a variety of low-wage jobs as security guards, bank tellers, sales clerks, computer instructors, home health aides and office support staff members. At work they present an image of adult responsibility, while in the shelter they must obey curfews and show evidence that they are actively looking for housing and saving part of their paycheck. Advocates of affordable housing say that the employed homeless are proof of the widening gap between wages and rents — which rose in the city even during the latest recession — and, given the shortage of subsidized housing, of just how difficult it is to escape the shelter system, even for people with jobs.

slavin
We do all split shifts, minimum wage job. Shifts are 6AM-10PM in order to do the morning & evening commute. We spend the off time in the middle of the day, when the techies are at work, sitting in the bus in the parking lots outside in the heat. I’m not kidding! At ebay, bus drivers are not allaowed to even take the bus to go get lunch; we are expected to sit unpaid in the bus for 6-9 hours, waiting for the evening commute to start. At Google, the employees all get unlimited free meals, but the bus drivers are not even allowed in the restaurants to BUY a meal! My company eventually dropped Google because they got sued by the drivers. One-by-one, the local bus companies are learning that they cannot make money on these routes, or protect themselves from lawsuits over the horrible treatment of the drivers.

A lightly edited comment by Michael Dennis, a former Google and eBay shuttle driver, from the LA Times story, San Francisco split by Silicon Valley’s wealth (via). (via blech)

Torn between THIS JUST IN and ALWAYS REBLOG. Posting either way.

(via slavin)

Awful and disgraceful.